British Meat Organization

Someday, meat-eating will be seen as a historical curiosity, an unenlightened, counterproductive and tragic waste of the past. Man’s wanton carnivorous behavior – and particularly agricultural torturous industrial processes from steroids to slaughterhouses – will be crammed into the dustbin of history to rest alongside ritual sacrifice, slavery, gender inequality and smoking tobacco.

And like these other notions which debased our very humanity itself, enlightenment will come through, quite simply, a superior morality – a humane morality for the future, if you will – and a righteous militant attitude today. As George Bernard Shaw once put it, “It seems to me, looking at myself, that I am a remarkably superior person, when you compare me with other writers, journalists, and dramatists; and I am perfectly content to put this down to my abstinence from meat. That is the simple and modest ground on which we should base our non-meat diet…”

This is the philosophy driving BritishMeat.org.uk, a website plainly devoted to exposing the myths helping keep an unhealthy and cruel lifestyle alive in modern society. How strange will we seem to future generations who will see a wounded biosphere left in the wake of human greed.

One can understand the rise of human meat-eating through the spread of livestock domestication throughout Eurasia due to difficult living conditions, harsh seasonal changes and/or the concomitant utility of the beasts. Indeed, one reason given for the high proportion of vegetable matter to animal matter consumed is the sheer difficulty of the hunt. In areas of the Fertile Crescent, the hunting of beasts as well as the domestication of animals for food were practiced far less frequently, thanks to the bountiful lushness of the land and favourability of climate.

But in the 21st century? Advanced medicine combined with high technology including ever-speedier international transportation would appear to eliminate the need for the over-consumption of meat. Were fairer distribution practices in place, any person could have access to a nutritionally complete diet based entirely on vegetable matter. Even with an occasional splurge to tuck into the flesh of a dead animal, the radically reduced level of meat consumption would certainly eliminate the need for the large-scale livestock-processing operations that have barbarity and cruelty literally down to a science.

British Meat Org UKWith heavy financial support backing Britain’s meat industry, social enlightenment will take some time. Far-ranging and high-publicised studies released by no less an authority than the National Health Service showing a link between diets high in red/processed meats and colorectal cancer are finally appearing to make a dent in overall British meat consumption in the 21st century but with so much propaganda encouraging citizens to eat meat out of a sense of national pride (!), it seems this fight will ultimately be won by a future generation.

Meanwhile, here’s a list of bonus extra ingredients typically found in red meat for you to peruse over lunch: antibiotics (including but not limited to Amoxicillin, Ampicillin, Ceftiofur Hydrochloride, Enrofloxacin, Oxytetracycline, Sulfadimethoxine, Sulfamethazine and Tilmicosin); dioxin; fecal matter (rat and other); estrogen, progesterone and testosterone; synthetic estrogen, synthetic progesterone and synthetic testosterone; livestock innards; manure; pesticides (also herbicides, insecticides and larvicides); the meat by-product known as ‘pink slime’; sodium penabarbital; tranquilizers; and urine. Yummy! You can purchase your British meat online and pay for it in various UK online payment methods.

British meat traditions

British meat traditions
The traditionally-minded in Britain and much of the “West” who espouse the virtues of meat-eating as patriotic. Millennials generally and the occasional Generation X parent who raised them are more and more frequently scoffing at such dogma: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs statistics show that overall consumption of meat and meat products in Britain in down 15.5% since year 2000 and 32% since 1980.

History of British meat/promotion of meat in British society

History of British meat/promotion of meat in British society
Today, proponents of meat products and/or the industry in general stake their emotional claims in a bedrock of British nationalism, arguing that the acting of eating meat is tied in with the very essence of Britishness. Beyond the dogmatic trappings and spurious logic of the Buy British Beef sort of supposition lies a central explorable truth, however: The history of British meat consumption is interwoven with that of the country itself.

Animal rights and the anti-meat movement

Animal rights and the anti-meat movement
While Britain has quite a long and sordid history with over-consumption of animal flash products, one may take solace in England and Britain’s long history of countermanding the gaping maw of consumerism – and for a commendingly long time. The revolutionary idea that other beings on planet Earth actually might be given consideration vis-à-vis the right to, likesay, exist, can be traced back to Victorian England and some quite notable names from early 19th-century society.

Is being a vegan healthier?

Is being a vegan healthier?
It’s a frequency asked question in online searches, and one destined to return vague answers full of “two sides” types of information and “debate.” Said considerations of the carnivorous-versus-vegan diet argument has been reduced to the typical state of any argument in the 21st century which could potentially be solved by science, namely the presentation of scientific evidence as debatable opinion.

British Meat Logo

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